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Chinese lions glare at each other.

I neglected my doors post! As if fourteen billion posts from my New England trip wasn’t enough, I also took photos of doors, which I obviously can’t resist, and they have been patiently waiting in a “Doors” folder on my desktop. Finally, the time is upon us!

Please take a look at the collection of doors I liked from my trip this spring. I have forgotten where most of them came from, which is a loss. But I think they are a lot of fun even without some of the context.

My friend, Will, and I traveled from Maine, to New Hampshire, to Massachusetts, to Rhode Island. These were scattered along the way.

I do like columns at the entryway.

Columns with a pretty curved roof.

Columns are even better when surrounding a detailed metal door like this.

These columns are not as impressive, but I appreciate the sign at the gate: “Home for Aged Women.” It was built for Benjamin Crowninshield, a member of Congress and Secretary of the Navy before he died in 1851. His son, William Crowninshield, was born in this home, and grew up to be a Supreme Court Justice and the Secretary of War, who died in 1900.

The simplicity drew me to this one. I wonder if the dog sticker is to help people identify the right address?

The aging actually makes it more attractive.

Bricks are often gorgeous.

Don’t miss the bull’s head above the awning.

Churches have the most beautiful doors.

Not a “door” but a doorway.

A typical door in Boston’s financial district. But the sign over the door says, “Site of the first meeting house in Boston, built 1632.”

A residence door painstakingly aged.

And last but not least: the door of a liquor store that made me bust up laughing. The T-shirt in the window says “I got it in the Bunghole”

I have learned to time my collections of doors, when I have them, to be able to participate in Norm’s Thursday Doors community. His idea is a great one, and by the number of responses, clearly an idea that resonates with bloggers.

East door of Dublin Castle. St Patrick (In Ireland around 400 AD) on the right faces off with Brian Boru (High king of Ireland until his death in 1014) on the left.

Expressive king.

This post is because I love doors, and because a friend of mine blogs door photos, and she inspires me. Do you have a blogger friend who inspires you to see the world in a new way?

My intrepid offspring, Tara, and I recently returned from a week in Ireland. Each time a door grabbed my attention, it made me think of Manja (and also Norm, the door blog guy). I began a collection of them. Please take a look at these wonderful doors of early spring in Ireland. When I look at these, I can remember the mood and excitement of the moment when I took the photo.

Our first day Tara was sick in bed (drat the luck!!) and I put on all the warm clothes I had (not quite enough) and walked around by myself in the rain at 41 degrees (5 C) and the voices in my head switched back and forth from “Damn it’s cold,” to “Whoah! That’s cool!” I discovered right away some buildings that look almost identical to each other, facing each other across a carpark. One is a library and one is a museum. I went inside the museum for its free admission and heaters.

Door to the National Library of Ireland, which matches…

…the National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology door.

Doors inside the National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology.

The front door of our Airbnb place in Dublin – 2 George’s Quay – between Starbucks and Offbeat Donut.

Look at this magnificently adorned door in Kilmainham Gaol in Dublin.

Over the following week the weather gradually improved. North of Dublin we visited some very very old doorways (albeit no doors) in the Boyne River Valley. I hope you consider that these count:

Entrance to Newgrange, north of Dublin. Built approximately 3200 BC, it’s older than Stonehenge. The oldest doorway I’ve walked through in my life.

Mound of the Hostages at the Hill of Tara has a doorway.

And then we made our way to southern Ireland, where they had more doors!! We were delighted to walk through them when we could.

Entrance to St. Fin Barre’s Cathedral in Cork, glittering in the setting sun. It was behind a gate so this is as close as we got.

At the Muckross Friary in Killarney National Park, a couple more doorways caught my eye. Again, there are no actual doors, but I liked them anyway.

This doorway is the entrance to the cemetery at the Muckross Friary.

Steps lead to a passage through a wall at Muckross Friary.

We parked by this door in the town of Cashel, when we stopped to find a place to eat. I not only love the red colour and the doorknocker, but the knob in the center of the door.

Cashir Castle hosted this sketchy door. Dare you to walk through…

My favourite door of the entire trip. Wood bound in iron, stone, and a guard bird. I thought at first it might be an eagle, but the beak isn’t right. Who is the bird to which we owe our gratitude?

Entrance to Providence City Hall. What a beautiful way to see “please use a different entrance.”

This one will be real quick since I’ve got other stuff to do today.

My blogger friend Manja posts a lot of doors, and while I was in Providence I kept thinking of her while I noticed doors. I took photos of a few. This selection is not comprehensive of what’s in Providence, Rhode Island, nor is it a complete collection in any sense. Just a few doors that I thought were pretty, and remembered to take a photo.

Entrance to the Rhode Island State House.

The magnificent doors of St. Stephens Church.

One of my many guises

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