Japanese garden in the sun

A and Tara pose for me at the Japanese garden
A and Tara pose for me at the Japanese garden

This post can be a complement to my post from several years ago, Japanese garden in the rain. Both times I forgot to bring my camera, so the photos from both posts are taken by phones. In comparing the two, the advances in cell phone camera technology are evident.

Tara met an Italian exchange student at their school, two weeks before school was out. The visiting student had not yet had a chance to see many sights of Portland, and it was almost time to return to Italy. Tara was dismayed. I got a text while I was at work, “Will you please take us to the Japanese garden this weekend? She has to see more of Portland!”

It was a very sunny and hot day and we looked forward to the shady glades of the Japanese garden.

“Designed by Professor Takuma Tono in 1963, it encompasses 5.5 acres with 5 separate garden styles, and includes an authentic Japanese Tea House, meandering streams, intimate walkways, and a spectacular view of Mt. Hood.” ~from the brochure we received at the garden.

Sun filters through branches, colouring everything green and magical.
Sun filters through branches, colouring everything green and magical.
The Flat Garden (hira niwa) is a central focus of the garden, beside the pavillion.
The Flat Garden (hira niwa) is a central focus of the garden, beside the pavillion.
On the other side of the pavilion is this view of Mt. Hood, reminding many of Mt. Fuji because of its symmetrical shape.
On the other side of the pavilion is this view of Portland and Mt. Hood, reminding many of Mt. Fuji because of its symmetrical shape.
Inside the pavilion, events are held. It was a bonsai exhibit in my
Inside the pavilion, events are held. It was a bonsai exhibit in my “rainy” post. This time a pottery exhibit. Most of the pottery displays were traditional, but this artist was fanciful.
A look inside the pavilion
A look inside the pavilion
The Flat Garden
The Flat Garden
I was pleased with the fine touches in the garden, such as the gracefully curved railings.
I was pleased with the fine touches in the garden, such as the gracefully curved railings.
Irises grew from the water beside a wooden walking path that kept our feet dry.
Irises grew from the water beside a wooden walking path that kept our feet dry.
It was past peak spring colour, but these azaleas still added a spark to the shady greenery.
It was past peak spring colour, but these azaleas still added a spark to the shady greenery.
The Strolling Pond Garden
The Strolling Pond Garden
Shady stone path
Shady stone path

After our time in the shade, we crossed the road to another famous Portland garden: The International Rose Test Garden, named for its mission of testing new rose varieties. Built in 1917, this garden holds over 7000 rose plants of 550 varieties. It was in full sunlight and roasting. Despite the heat, it was a gorgeous Sunday afternoon and was filled with visitors. The roses were spectacular, and the scents intoxicating. Our new friend A kept a brochure to send home to her family. We had done our small part in encouraging good international relations. 🙂

Looking down onto the Rose Test Garden.
Looking down onto the Rose Test Garden.
Aisles of fragrance and colour.
Aisles of fragrance and colour.
Most of the roses were as tall as we were, and the blossoms were nose-height: perfect.
Many of the roses were as tall as we were, and the blossoms were nose-height: perfect.

23 thoughts on “Japanese garden in the sun

      1. The need for water to quench my thirst seems to have increased the older I get. Thanks for the reminder, Crystal. I liked the azure blue reflection of the sky in the strolling pond garden. 🙂

  1. You’ve taken some good photos with your phone Crystal! I must use mine more often…… The vibrant greens drew me in with a cooling wash [even though temps here = icy!] It seems a shame the visiting student didn’t get to see much of Portland it sounds such a lively and interesting city! Tara is a star!!

  2. I agree with Bruce – it’s so green!
    And those roses are beautiful. That last photo in particular.
    You know, Crystal, you are such a great Mom … I love that you dropped everything to make a visitor to Portland see such a neat place.

    1. Thank you for the compliment, Laurie. All my altruism is out of selfishness. I get such a charge out of watching other people have fun, and I love knowing when I have been able to help make it happen.

  3. I think it’s interesting that we can each go to the same place and see things from a completely different perspective. Tara has a kind heart. You did good. Heather and I did the Japanese Garden last spring, I think. It actually looks different from your perspective. Canada was different too. 🙂 Fingers still crossed. Hugs.

  4. My husband is a fiend for Japanese gardens, and a photographer. I’d love to share this with him. I know he’d be obsessed with the thought of the photos he could take. I think I will check it out, see if we can’t plan a fall trip. I’ll bet it’s beautiful then as it appears now.

    It was so kind of you to share this with Tara. I’m sure she will remember both it and you fondly.

    Portland is calling!

    1. I am sure the Japanese garden would be gorgeous in the Fall, too. It’s not too expensive ($9 each, for us), and minutes from downtown. Your husband would probably love it, because it’s a quality, authentic Japanese garden. Fall is also a good time for the second bloom for the roses.

      Here’s hoping you make a Portland visit. I would love to be a tour guide for you both, if you need one. And I also am happy to offer my home if you need a place to stay.

  5. BEAUTIFUL!!! I went to a garden out my way (PA) that had a Japanese garden section- and there was a shooting range nearby – we wandered around the garden with the sounds of machine guns in the background- not very zen! Haha! 🙂

    1. Omigosh, that is absolutely hilarious! Not very zen! ha ha ha

      I am glad that there are specialty gardens all around the world. How nice that humans continue to think it is important to have gardens, when there are so many other things going on. Hm… maybe it is because of all those other things, that we need gardens.

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