Goodbye Tree

A photojournal of the final days of one tree’s life:

My phone captured Mt. Hood peeking above the tree farm trees.
My phone captured Mt. Hood peeking above the tree farm trees.
IMG_0741
Tara is testing the tree height to see if it will be right for our living room.
Stringing lights and scattering needles everywhere. (I'm still finding them!)
Getting ready to string lights and scatter needles everywhere. (I’m still finding them!)
Glass ball received as a gift from Mom years ago.
Glass ball received as a gift from Mom years ago.
Cloth origami crane from my trip to Japan.
Cloth origami crane from my trip to Japan.
Gift time! Tara's holding a T-shirt with the pattern of the Portland International Airport carpet.
Gift time! Tara’s holding a T-shirt with the pattern of the Portland International Airport carpet.
Gifts gone, and it looks a little empty beneath that tree. I love how the lights reflect off the floor.
Gifts gone, and it looks a little empty beneath that tree. I love how the lights reflect off the floor. (Yes, yes, it’s a ginormous TV. I didn’t buy it, it’s actually a hand-me-down.)
Goodbye tree. You are still beautiful. Thank you for being in our home.
Goodbye tree. You are still beautiful. Thank you for being in our home.

My neighbor across the street has a friend with goats, and the goats just love to eat Christmas trees. So… that’s where the tree will go next.

14 thoughts on “Goodbye Tree

    1. I know, right?! The neighbor came over two years ago, as I was dragging my tree to the curb, and she says, almost apologetically, “Would it be ok if I took your tree to my friends house? She has goats…”

  1. Probably need to add a pic of the goats dining on it… and maybe even it later becoming fertilizer. You know, just to show the full circle of life. 😉 Happy New Year. 

    Typos by DROID. 

  2. Love it that the tree is going to the goats. I have a friend who blogs from England where the retired trees are taken to a local zoo, and apparently loved by the lions, not of eating but for snuggling up to. 🙂 –Curt

    1. That’s a great story, Curt! I wouldn’t have thought the trees would be so appreciated by lions. However, now that you mention it, I can kind of see why. When Tara and I first dragged the tree into the yard, I pressed through all the branches, looking for any Victorian tinsel that might still be caught. They are the twisted tin (in the glass ball photo), and I have been using them since the 1990s. Anyway, each time I pressed a branch aside, a billow of warm house air came out of the tree – so noticeable in the cold outside air. The lions must benefit from the trees’ capacity to hold warmth.

  3. I love that the goat will carry on this tree in another form 🙂
    It served you well and it will serve the goat well, too!
    The comment from Curt and your reply is interesting as well … retained warmth. Lovely

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